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Us 5, America 4, The City 3, Chicago 3, John 2, Shannon 2, Chiu 2, Phil Ginsberg 2, U.s. 2, Philadelphia 2, Wrieri 1, Our City 1, Causey 1, Ian Kalen 1, Peter Hirschberg 1, Beta 1, Rick Robbins 1, Kevin 1, Todd Park 1, Cdc 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    January 16, 2013
    9:30 - 10:00pm PST  

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if you're interested, or you know someone who is interested, you can send a tweet to sfmoci and we'll be posting the job announcement there. so, thank you very much. it's my pleasure to introduce the general manager of our rec and park department who has done some great partnerships around open data, phil ginsberg. (applause) >> can you all hear me? i'll talk into the mic. i'm the general manager of your recreation and park department and i really couldn't be happier. the recreation and park department is a city agency that historically has suffered from maybe the worst website and some of the worst technology in government. and over the last few years we have worked really hard to improve that park user's experience through the use of technology. and i want to start out before we talk a little about the app saying a if you thank yous. i really want to thank mayor lee to his incredible commitment to technology and frankly the recreation and park department.
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i want to thank supervisor chiu who has been a leader both in the parks world and in the technology world. sf city has really been a driving force behind helping government think about new ways, new and improved ways maybe for some of you they're old ways now. but new and improved ways for government to reach users of our programs and services. and i want to say the last special thank you to the folks from apple-liscious. this thing is awesome. this past year, the trust for public land which is a national parks organization determined that san francisco, which has 4,000 acres of open space and over 220 parks, over 15% of the city's land is open space. the trust for public land said we have the best urban park system in america. and the challenge for us is making sure that all of our park users understand all of the wonderful things in our park system and know how to use our parks to tailor to their
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own specific experience. as diverse as this city is, there are hundreds if not thousands of different ways that people like to use and enjoy our parks. and in this app there is information about our parks, about our play grounds, about our ball fields, about our trails, about our community gardens, about the 300 pieces of public art in our jurisdiction. you can reserve a picnic bench. there's a running feed of news and events. you can volunteer in our park system by using this app. you can donate to the recreation and park department a very worthy causey might add using this app. and you can find all kinds of incredible information. so, we are just so thrilled and i wanted to give just such a big thank you to apple-liscious. we've been trying to figure out how to make it out in a world of declining resources and really they knocked on our door and they said, we want to help. we like to say around here that in the 21st century government
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can't do it alone any more. we need partners and, boy, did we find a great one. this platform is really going to help fulfill the incredible potential of our park users. 96% of san franciscans live within 10 minutes walk of a park which is an amazing, amazing, amazing stat. and now we have a tool to make it easier and more enjoyable for people to get what they need out of our parks. so, again, i'm very grateful. i want to give a big shout out to sean who is here from my staff who spent hours and hours and hours working with yo yashida. (applause) >> at the end of the day this is about content. and sean really partnered with apple-liscious who came up with a good idea and we believe it is one of the most powerful mobile applications certainly in the parks world and maybe in government. and right now it's primarily focused on information with a little bit of reservations but
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it's going to be able to do so much more over time as we continue to evolve as a department. so, love your parks. download one of these things. and let me introduce yo yashid, a. let me say to all of you out here keep doing what you're doing * . because with your help you are really making government better. so, i wanted to say thank you to the hatchery and everybody in this room. yo? (applause) >> thank you, thank you, mayor ed lee. thank you, phil ginsberg and the hatchery for hosting us. i use open data. our company was founded three years ago using open data. we are one of the first sustainable companies to use open data and be sustainable innovation, meaning we can generate revenue and keep mobile applications for government going. we are really excited to be here today. this is our official launch of apple-liscious. i would like to thank our team,
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kevin, rick robbins, moment of all [speaker not understood] for my cto and co-founder. this was a very long, long journey with the city, but we had the help of leaders like phil, mayor lee, jay driving behind the scenes, the efforts for business to work with government. and i think we've accomplished that with this unique partnership moving forward. we're excited now there's cross-department collaboration with the san francisco arts, with the san francisco public art which has now been thanks to sean working late last night, putting the public arts into golden gate park. this is providing access. it's providing efficiency, and it's providing new revenue streams and opportunities for the city of san francisco and other departments. we are really excited to be here and i thank you all again for this opportunity to be able to innovate, to be able to work
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with the city of san francisco, and have this incredible opportunity to be here at the hatchery launching our application and our company. thank you very much. (applause) >> thank you, yo. so, san francisco has been a leader in open data for the past three years nationally. in 2009 we launched our open data initiative, one of the first cities to do so. in 2010 we partnered with the white house to launch open 311 api, the first ever read write api for cities. we now have over 40 cities that have joined us. in 2011 we partnered with gray area foundation on a series of hack-a-thons, 10,000 attendees, and created nearly 30 applications all being powered by open data. now in 2012 we have our legislation that you heard about. as you heard, we announced the chief data officer. we have a network of open data coordinators within each
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agency. and these coordinators, their primary responsibility is to provide insight, is to provide transparency into the data sets that they manage. and that's really important. we want to make sure that you guys have a clear understanding in our community about the data that we manage so you can tell us where we should be going next in terms of opening up our data sets. we also are doing some structural changes so that open data is really the default position for our city. we're making sure that data belongs to our city, not the vendor. and second, we're making sure that any software that we buy or build hatx a public api or some equivalent. we don't want to be held hostage by a vendor or by technology. this data belongs to our constituents. we are simply stewards of it. in closing, i want to thank the hatchery, i want to thank our city leadership, mayor, as well as president chiu and partnering with us on this legislation. and i want to thank all of you in our community who have really done amazing things with this data. it's just a celebration of the
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good work that you're doing that we're here. open data would not exist without our community. so, with that, i'm going to actually hand it off to 100 plus to do a really quick demo and then we're going to do a little q & a and we'll have them come up next. >> 100 plus, we're based here in san francisco. we are interested in small healthy behaviors, ways to be healthy that don't involve going to the gym. we created a system where we recommend hops or help opportunities. these are little activities and places that are seed by users and served to other users based on location. and we used open data to seed our entire system. so, we input over a thousand things from open data including parks and fountains and civic art and to focus on trying to get people to walk more in their daily life. so, we have things like parks
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and there are 695 pieces of civic art in the city. what he we do, then, is take these -- we serve up based on your current location. if you're interested in doing that, we share who created the activity so we give people credit for inspiring others. we show you information about the activity that it's free, it's food for kids, where it is, and then photos of other people who have completed this activity. and if you're interested in doing it, we route it for you and as you're doing that we collect data from the gps showing how much work you put in. so, steps in intensity, elevation distance travel. our goal is to make health not feel like work. show an impact doing small things like taking the stairs instead of escalator, walking somewhere to get a healthy lunch. we created an overall health score based on life expectancy. for that we're using a lot of data from the u.s. government, cdc, another company called practice fusion and electronic
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medical record vendor. and again, what we try to do is make health fun and make the experience of health about exploring this great city that we're in and then showing the long-term health benefits of doing so. right now we're looking for beta users in the city and we'll launch in about a month or two. thank you very much. we're really happy to be here. (applause) >> cool, we're going to do a short panel talking about the state of open data and sort of what specifically some of these companies are doing which you've gotten a brief peek on. again, you're probably familiar with, already know who a lot of these people are. really quick go down and have everyone introduce them self. >> hello,ishv. my name is ian kalen, hottved by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen
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hack-a-thon, [speaker not understood], build apps and explore what's possible. >> i'm chris, the co-founder and ceo of 100-plus and we use data from many different sources to try to help people be more healthy in their daily life. >> hi. [speaker not understood]. we're a mapping and location-based analytics platform. and we are working with open data and trying to see how we can turn data into information, data into knowledge, and the kind of decision products. >> hi, i'm john, ceo of motion loft. we're trying to understand how people move around cities and provide that data to the public to build new tools for public safety. >> hi, i'm [speaker not understood] with code for america. we're a peace core for geeks. we're trying to bring talent from the private second for and government to innovate. we work with dozens of citieses
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across the country and next year we should be working with san francisco which is up, great. >> i'm filling in for a second. [speaker not understood]. >> hi, i'm yo yashida for appaliscious. >> we'll try to get a conversation going to talk about typically what you're doing. i'd be interested in hearing each one of you talk a little more about what you think -- it certainly is a term we're hearing a lot today and in the past. we'd love to hear what you think open data is now, sort of how far along are we in terms of actually getting governments to release that data and actually getting companies to do interesting things with it. >> this is kind of awkward sitting on his shoulder. you know, we've been doing this in america for awhile. i would say this is a nice turning point.
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before there were people on the outside banging on the door, open data, give me your data. now you're seeing governments take the turn themselves and set up a culture and the institutions like chief data officers where they're actually proactively doing it themselves. this will actually be the third chief data officer in the country. chicago has one, philadelphia has one. so, [speaker not understood]. i have mixed feelings about it. no. i just think that it's great to see governments themselves start to do this and that means there is going to be a vibrant ecosystem. >> just to add to that, [speaker not understood]. in fact, we actually learned a lot of lessons from what finphily and chicago have done. >> we're looking at what departments are working with. they're improving their data. open data legislation has been out there. we've bon working with them because we realize they need to have clean data sets to have good information for the public. so, it's been kind of a synergy
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between the private sector and the public sector where the departments themselves have been motivated in assigning tasks to their department to make sure that those data sets are clean which then benefits both public and the private sector. >> so, i'm pretty excited about living in a city that is kind of the forefront of public data. i can't really think of another city that has spurred so much innovation as well as san francisco. [speaker not understood]. >> we're also really excited about this. everybody is going to say that, but as a private company who builds tools and allow you to do things with data, this is one of the most important things that's happening for our customers, this movement of open data. i get asked every day by our customers, i'd like to do this, but where is the data, how do i get the data? they have the idea, but they don't have the resources to
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necessarily make that idea -- bring that idea to fruition. and, so, this is going to mean huge things for innovation as the mayor said, and huge things for our customers. we work with a lot of civic start-ups who are trying to do better things for their community and by combining private data that you see in here with companies, with the public data through the portal, we can actually start to make businesses around the data. >> i think we're at the very, very beginning of this. one of the best parts of the job is i get to hang out with other people who are really trying to do very innovative things and be very creative. i talk about some of the data sets we use. most people still don't know they exist despite great efforts from the city and others. and, you know, a lot of entrepreneurs that we're looking for is the way to get leverage, a way to build an experience or build a product before we have 100,000 users using it. open data is the key way to do that.
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you can start out with this experience, very lively and robust with very few users. and then when the first users come in, there is actually something for them to do and see. and i think that you'll start to see as the data sets get more robust and a little bit better and hopefully as we get to improve them ourselves and put them back into the public domain, the innovation that comes off with them is just going to grow exponentially. >> this seems like a really important moment. the world of civic innovation until now has really been focused on sort of open public data and the private data world has been separate. the fact that the city realizes that it is private data that adds to that and provides so much more richness because it is information as motion loft tells us where people are dwelling in the city or in the park applications how people are using it. when you add all that together, that leads to new forms of innovation. this summer there was a project in singapore, urban prototyping singapore where we worked with local interests to open up over
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30 private data sets and we had to engineer, what kind of contract would you have? how would you handle privacy? how would you let people use it for only that purpose? that form of innovation as it spreads here and elsewhere i think leads to a whole lot of new possibilities and applications. and this great cross trading between the private second for and public sector is just now taking off. in many ways san francisco has a special responsibility here. lots of cities are investing in opening data. that's a lot of supply. you need the demand side to prove to the city it's worthwhile and to prove to the public you can build an ecosystem there. we can do things with that whether bottom up activities, gray area or private companies. so, it's a moment of real burst of innovation and the landscape changes as the public and private sides come together. >> i very much agree with everything that was said. i'll add that in addition to the public sector, at the city level for open data disclosures and the private sector i can also speak to how important
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this is at the federal government level as well as we continue to work with cities across america to get more open data sets released, to the question about the history and we really look to recent examples to see the dura power of open data sets. my favorite examples are weather when weather data was released, weather channel.com and many others, and gps global positioning system. we know the history there was the military infrastructure that liberated public consumption and use, but the things we expected such as navigation, but also things that people didn't necessarily anticipate in the beginning such as precision crop farming which lowers the cost of food in the supermarket ultimately. so, the question is now what is the next gps, what else can be done? how can the federal government work with cities, with platforms like cities.data,.gov and other systems like that. how can we liberate some of this data while also protecting privacy and confidentiality which is hugely important and something that we're seeking to celebrate and support in a way our customers which i'm sitting
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alongside here, for the entrepreneurs and the organizations that are using consuming this data to turn them into real value. that is something that is very significant priority for the administration and that's why the president launched an open data initiative to support. >> let me dig a little more on the federal side. can you talk a little more about the work that you specifically are doing and sort of, you know, how the department of energy when it became interested in open data, what is available right now? >> there is so much available for start-ups right now. it's hard to choose a few favorites. wow, i can tell you what some of the best ones that people have told me are the most popular so that will be like many other things in the start-up world, it's not the government that is going to come up with the answer. it's partners working together to find the solution. so, one data set that comes to mind, i want to do a show of hands. i get this question a lot in terms of how much of the work is getting out there. how many of you have ever heard of the green button, a green button? most of the panelists and
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audience members. it's a good thing we're here. it is a initiative launched by the white house but industry led. you should be able to get your own energy data in a machine readable format you can then give to companies, organizations like the ones being celebrated here today to provide real value to you such as saving money, improving energy efficiency, and protecting the environment. so, the green button here we are in san francisco, i can say with some public comfort that pg&e is a signatory to the green button, download my data. and basically you go to the utility website. you can download your own green button data which by itself is, well, i'm an energy guy, an energy geek. i consider with confidence. it is not interesting, necessarily, but when you take your green button data and you give it to some companies, they have amazing things they can do with that green button to, again, save you money. something as simple as if you look at your green button which is kilowatt hours for those that are engineering minded, a line grab if you think about t some companies today can look
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at your green button and figure out if your refrigerator is broken function need a new air conditioner. that's real money if you think about it at a commercial or industrial scale. that is one data set. to your other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events.
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we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have people actually talking about it because the demand side, as we were talking about it, will be there because there is going to be someone there. there have to be people working with it who are getting out there. i think this is what this city is going to be really powerful.
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in terms of other cities doing as well, chicago is doing some really interesting stuff. scary cool stuff. they're taking 3 in 1 data, pothole request and crime report and matching it up with social media. they're getting this really deep and rich picture of what is going on in the city. and you can do that with data when you think about it creatively. philadelphia as i mentioned, they are really active in open data. and new york, again with 3 in 1 is doing smart analytics. i think that's what you'll see happening as well, government starts to become smarter, make better decisions, better policies. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data
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available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot of value there. how do you sort of balance, protecting the value of your data and commercial viability versus making it available to the public? >> so, we have a unique problem, i think, to a lot of start-ups in the fact that we have a product that we sell and a lot of different vertical. we also have data we want to provide to the society at large. and how do we not step on our own toes and give away our own data and make the company worthless. so, it's tough. it's a definite fine line between the two. today we announced that we're going to give crowding data to the city so you'll know where crowds are in the city and when they occur and where they
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occur. and that really isn't commercially viable for us. so, something we can provide to the city without any repercussions financially, which is great. we want to do more of those things. i made the decision to release this data about three minutes before a speech that i gave at spur a couple weeks ago. and literally, yeah, i was committed obviously, jay took me up the second i said t we have to go talk now. okay. so, jay walked it down. i think jay is great for partnering with start-ups as much as he does. >> great. who can be the other start-ups, people using the data to make products. you already talked about what you actually made. i'd love to hear more about the experience of working with the city's data like, you know, other things, like services or data points you would actually like -- would make it better
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and you can sort of take that. whoever has an answer ready can go first. >> and i have a microphone. i wanted to say this earlier and it kind of slipped my mind. we have the most amazing experience working with the city over the past just really the few weeks in building this application about urban growth. one at the data portals, it has a rich repository of information. but working with -- we had lots of questions, right. something maybe there were attributes or information that wasn't necessarily documented to the extent we wanted. and we asked the question, we would get these immediate responses with really insightful conversations that would come out of it. i think that type of collaboration is only going to make the portal better. the more people use it the better it's going to get. we also experienced some challenges, you know. we did a lot of work with the data. we did a lot of data, put things together. we did things like added value,
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added certain locations. and i would love to be able to pull that back up to a shared community portal. from what i can tell it wasn't necessarily promoted at this time, but i think there is a lot of value in that. and shannon, interrupt me if i'm speaking -- if that's -- if i'm stating anything that's incorrect. you know, i know that they went through a special process. maybe we make it a little easier, a little more seamless so that anybody is pulling down data and doing things, they can't push it back up. that was one of the things we would love to see. >> probably shouldn't have been in public, but we were very naive about the whole process and we were actually trying to feed content locations around the city. and started to do this and started to think there must be a list out there. there must be a list of every park in san francisco. i would find it in wikipedia.
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we stumbled into the sf data website and started looking. it was unbelievable, actually. so, some of the data sets we really needed were already there in very, very good format. and random things that i would never think of like movie set locations in the city of san francisco or every piece of civic art that was there, just really interesting things all with, you know, latitude-longitude, tags and information about them. it was really interesting. and then in my first meeting, in our first meeting with the innovation group, the city i heard of 10 other things that i clearly should have been using and didn't even know existed, literally within the first 15 minutes of the meeting. ss things like street safety, sidewalk safety scores and quality scores so we could wrap people around places. * route people around places. really unbelievable. we availed ourselves of resources going forward. we had the same -- like any data set, you find great things about it. then there's missing values or
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is thisxtion that got auto populated. we fixed a lot of things. we fixed a lot of gps coordinates. we would love the ability to post that back up * . even if you're not crowd sourcing new things, you can definitely crowd source quality of a data set that way. >> yeah, it's been a really great experience working with 100 plus and motion loft. just to respond, i think that this is a whole new opportunity actually what you're talking about. in addition to reaching out to the private sector to generate more data sets as you just mentioned, there's also the opportunity to have better data sets from the work that you've done, scrubbing them and harmonizing them. i think there is also this really great opportunity to generate whne

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